Motivation, Engagement, and Evidence: Fall 2016 Teaching Learning Symposium

Teaching Symposium

The first Teaching and Learning Symposium sponsored by Academic Affairs and the Peer Review of Teaching in Spring 2015 focused on the faculty’s role in realizing UNL’s land-grant mission. That mission is vital to positively impacting the lives of students across the university. The symposiums are an opportunity to participate in conversations about teaching and learning, to hear from experts on emerging issues in improving student outcomes, and to network with others seeking to improve teaching at UNL.

Academic Affairs is again sponsoring with a number of partners a Teaching and Learning Symposium around the themes of Motivation, Engagement, Innovation, and Evidence. The keynote address is focused on current research in the science of learning and its impact on strategies that faculty can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. The concurrent sessions broaden the discussion by digging deeper into key topics centered on evidence-based instructional strategies in course design, working with teams, and teaching in a variety of learning spaces. In response to requests at the Spring 2016 Symposium, concurrent sessions that focus specifically on teaching international students and approaches to creating opportunities for difficult conversations will be offered. Other topics include the migration to Canvas from Blackboard, research on student motivation and its impact on instruction and ultimately student learning, and a look at teaching as a scholarly endeavor worthy of research.

Registration for the event has closed.

Friday, October 7, 2016

1:00 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Check-in begins at 12:30 p.m.

Nebraska Innovation Campus

2021 Transformation Drive,
Lincoln NE 68508

Symposium Follow-Up Materials Additional materials specific to each session can be found in the schedule below

  • Summer Institute of Online Teaching - UNL’s Summer Institute for Online Teaching (SIOT) provides preparation and training as well as a campus-wide faculty learning community focused on online teaching.
  • Innovative Instructional Design consults with and supports faculty developing and teaching online, blended, and face-to-face courses and/or implementing curriculum redesign projects.
  • Migrate to Canvas by May 2018 - UNL is moving from Blackboard to Canvas, with the goal of having all LMS activity in Canvas by May 2018. Download this file for migration schedule and support options.
  • Peer Review of Teaching Project - Even if you value and support excellence in teaching, it is often difficult to capture the intellectual work of your teaching in a form that can be conveyed easily to others. Get information about the Advanced Program.

Schedule of Events Learn more about the Keynote and Breakout sessions below

1:00 p.m.

Welcome and Introductions: Marjorie Kostelnik

Interim Senior Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Keynote Speaker: Kenneth Kiewra

Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

The Science of Learning: Helping Students SOAR to Success

Effective instruction and learning depend on four vital processes. In any learning situation, critical information must be Selected, Organized, Associated, and Regulated. Engaging these four processes helps students SOAR to success. Instructors can and should apply SOAR strategies. For example, objectives, cues, and skeletal notes can signal what information to select. Graphic representations such as hierarchies and matrices can organize information in ways that make veiled associations apparent. Examples and mnemonic techniques can also aid association. And, techniques such as self-testing and summarization can help regulate students’ understanding and mastery of new information. This presentation (a) describes and exemplifies how instructors can teach in SOAR-compatible ways and (b) teach students how to learn within the context of content instruction so they can SOAR to success on their own.

Keynote follow-up materials

Break

2:20 p.m.

Breakout Sessions

Choose one from the following sessions:

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Course Design and The Peer Review of Teaching Project

Jody Koenig Kellas, Professor, Communication Studies; Eve Brank, Associate Professor, Psychology, Director Center on Children, Families, and the Law; Abla Hasan, Assistant Professor of Practice of Arabic Language and Culture, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures; Rob Simon, Associate Professor of Practice, Marketing Department

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) focuses on “teaching and learning as serious intellectual work” (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, www.issotl.com), including as a worthy area of research focus. Faculty have engaged in a wide variety of SOTL inquiries as part of UNL’s Peer Review of Teaching Project. The Peer Review of Teaching Project (PRTP) is a faculty-led program that provides instructors with a structured and practical model that combines inquiry into the intellectual work of a course, careful investigation of student understanding and performance, and faculty reflection on teaching effectiveness. In the advanced PRTP program, participants have the opportunity to design, implement, and assess SOTL projects from their assessment of student learning on UNL’s campus. In this session, we will introduce participants to the elements of course design and showcase several projects to highlight the opportunities for engaging SOTL inquiry through PRTP.

If you are interested in engaging in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) as part of UNL’s Peer Review of Teaching Project (PRTP), please go to http://peerreview.unl.edu to learn more about how to participate in the first year program (for faculty who have never participated in PRTP). Alumni of the first year program are eligible to participate in subsequent year(s) in the Advanced Project where PRTP fellows have the opportunity to engage with each other and program leaders in the pursuit of SOTL projects. Please contact Eve Brank (ebrank2@unl.edu) or Jody Koenig Kellas (jkellas2@unl.edu) with any questions.


Setting Teams Up for Success

Chad Brassil, Associate Professor, Biological Science; Karen Stelling, Professor of Practice, Mechanical and Materials Engineering; Elina Ibrayeva, Assistant Professor of Practice, Management; Yasar Demirel, Associate Professor, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering; L. J. McElravy, Assistant Professor, Youth Civic Leadership, Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communication

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

In this session, panel presenters will discuss why and how they go about forming student teams and how their different approaches support student success. For example, sometimes random assignment is used, while others will carefully distribute or cluster student characteristics to make the most of student diversity or to ensure teams have requisite skills or knowledge. Moreover, to help set team expectations and improve the odds that teams will function effectively, students prepare documentation such as team charters. On other occasions, students are left to their own devices. Presenters will outline the pros and cons of their respective methods as well as the challenges remaining to be addressed.

CATME Information

On November 11, Chad Brassil will be presenting a more in-depth view of CATME as part of the Excellence in Teaching Workshop Series sponsored by the Continuous Improvement of Teaching and Learning Committee (CITL). Register to attend this free session.

Learn more about CATME on the project website at catme.org. If you are interested in using CATME in your course and would like assistance, please contact Sydney Brown (sbrown3@unl.edu).

Links to panel presenters’ slide decks


Canvas: Where We Are and How We Got Here

David Woodman, Professor of Practice, School of Biological Sciences; Kathy Castle, Assistant Professor of Practice, Communications Studies; Toni Anaya, Associate Professor, University Libraries; Ian Cottingham, Assistant Professor of Practice, Raikes School; Richard Leiter, Professor, College of Law; Heath Tuttle, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Information Technology Services; Jeremy Van Hof, Assistant Director, Academic Technologies, Information Technology Services

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Session follow-up materials

UNL conducted an extensive pilot of the Canvas Learning Management System Spring 2016, with 40 teaching faculty and over 1,800 students. In this session, instructors who have used the system will discuss their experiences moving from Blackboard, creating content, and teaching with this tool. Also, the technical team leading the pilot will share data and findings surrounding the pilot, including system use data and student and teacher feedback. The current state of Canvas at UNL and system-wide will also be addressed.

Canvas will become the default LMS for UNL in May of 2018. All information pertaining to Canvas can be found here: go.unl.edu/canvas. If you have any questions about the move, or need customized training or support please contact the UNL Canvas team at canvas@unl.edu.


Strategies for Making the Most of Flexible – and Inflexible – Classroom Spaces

June Griffin, Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education, College of Arts & Sciences; Roberto Cortinas, Assistant Professor of Practice, ISU/UNL Cooperative Veterinary Medicine Education Program, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

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Session follow-up materials

Faculty have learned the value of asking their students to actively engage with one another and the class materials rather than just passively receiving lectures. Active learning can be relatively easy to accommodate in a space designed for such purposes, but what about spaces with bolted chairs all pointing in one direction? And how do you make good use of the omnipresent technology and rolling furniture in new model classrooms so it supports learning and does not distract from it? This session will focus on practical solutions for teaching effectively within the variety of classroom spaces available on campus. Faculty who use active learning approaches in both "flexible" and "inflexible" spaces will provide examples from their experience to help all instructors get students productively involved, regardless of what room they are sitting in.

Write/reflect on answers to the following questions:

  • What kinds of pedagogies does the physical space of the classroom recommend?
    • What are the affordances of the space?
    • What are the constraints?
  • What specific challenges do you anticipate for the students in the class you plan to teach? (e.g. Roberto talked about the challenges of teaching a very large required course; June talked about keeping the focus and attention of freshmen)?
  • How might you stretch your use of the physical space or most apparent uses of available technologies to help address the challenges you identified?

Two resources for active learning strategies / inspiration / ideas:


Strategies for Teaching International Students

Chandra Schwab, Teacher of Mandarin Chinese Language and World History, Northern Star Online, Minnesota, M.Ed. University of Minnesota in Curriculum and Instruction with teaching certificate in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

This session will explore some of the challenges of teaching students from many different national, cultural, linguistic, and educational backgrounds as well as some strategies for helping these students be more successful in our classrooms. This session will address all international students' needs but will focus on how the Chinese education system and values affect their student experience in the United States.

In this session, we began an exploration of the challenges of teaching students from many different national, cultural, linguistic, and educational backgrounds and considered briefly some strategies for helping these students be more successful in our classrooms. If you wish to explore these issues further, there are a number of excellent resources gathered at the UNL International Engagement Website: Resources Focused on Integrating International Students.

Break

3:20 p.m.

Breakout Sessions II

Choose one from the following sessions:

Course Design Principles and Tools that Promote Deep Learning

Leilani Arthurs, Assistant Professor, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Center for Science, Mathematics, & Computer Education

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

Whether you are new to teaching or are a seasoned veteran, you might be interested in knowing more about what you can do to improve your students’ learning. The course plans that instructors make, even before the first day of class, can help students learn when those plans are implemented. Careful course design includes planning that places desired student learning outcomes at the center of instructional efforts. In this session, participants are introduced to three course design principles that work in tandem to promote deep learning among students. Participants will also be provided with a set of tools that they can keep, use as resources, and immediately apply in their new and/or ongoing course development efforts. This session provides a general introduction to course design and is open to faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines.

It was a pleasure hosting you in the interactive session about course design principles and tools for enhancing deep student learning.  You had the opportunity to witness how to model using research-based instructional strategies in the classroom (i.e. reflective activity, jigsaw activity, and ‘clicker’ polling questions), including some of the logistical considerations needed to implement them.

Whichever learning activities we choose to implement in our courses, they are most effective when they are first informed by learning goals and aligned with the assessments we use to determine the extent to which students achieve those learning goals.  If you are interested in learning more about what we can do to facilitate deep learning among our students at UNL by further exploring the principles of Backward Design and obtaining additional tools to enhance student learning, please consider participating in next semester’s “Learning by Design” Program which will be facilitated by Sydney Brown and Tareq Daher.  To find out more about the program scheduling, please contact Sydney at sbrown3@unl.edu

If you’d like to ever chat about teaching and learning issues over a coffee break or lunch, feel free to reach out to me.  I’m always happy to explore ideas with others about how to better assist students to be successful in college and beyond.  My email address is larthurs2@unl.edu

Best wishes to you and your teaching endeavors!
Leilani


Managing and Assessing Teamwork

Chad Brassil, Associate Professor, Biological Science; Karen Stelling, Professor of Practice, Mechanical and Materials Engineering; Elina Ibrayeva, Assistant Professor of Practice, Management; Yasar Demirel, Associate Professor, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering; L. J. McElravy, Assistant Professor, Youth Civic Leadership, Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communication

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

In this session, panel presenters will discuss how they help students manage teams and explore different ways of assessing teamwork. Presenters will outline the pros and cons of their respective methods for working with teams as well as the challenges remaining to be addressed.

CATME Information

On November 11, Chad Brassil will be presenting a more in-depth view of CATME as part of the Excellence in Teaching Workshop Series sponsored by the Continuous Improvement of Teaching and Learning Committee (CITL). Register to attend this free session.

Learn more about CATME on the project website at catme.org. If you are interested in using CATME in your course and would like assistance, please contact Sydney Brown (sbrown3@unl.edu).

Links to panel presenters’ slide decks


Canvas: Where We’re Going and How to Get There

Heath Tuttle, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Information Technology Services; Jeremy Van Hof, Assistant Director, Academic Technologies, Information Technology Services

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

The session will focus on the plan for Canvas going forward: what migration strategies and training options are envisioned. The formation of a Canvas Teachers Affinity Group will be outlined, and collaboration opportunities with the NU system, Big 10, Unizin, and larger Canvas community will be presented.

Canvas will become the default LMS for UNL in May of 2018. All information pertaining to Canvas can be found here: go.unl.edu/canvas. If you have any questions about the move, or need customized training or support please contact the UNL Canvas team at canvas@unl.edu.


Managing Difficult Conversations in the Classroom

Vaughn Love, Assistant Director, Academic Learning Communities; Regina Werum, Professor of Sociology and Undergraduate Studies Chair

Moderator: Nancy Mitchell, Director of Undergraduate Education and Professor Advertising

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Session follow-up materials

Chancellor Green requested “that all members of the University community be especially mindful of their responsibility to create an environment that is welcoming to all, where each person feels accepted, valued and safe.” Husker Dialogues provides an avenue for generating productive dialogue about diversity, inclusion, and social justice. During this session, participants will discuss strategies for managing difficult conversations when they emerge unintentionally, how to respond to student comments in ways that facilitate deeper engagement rather than shutting down the conversation and classroom dynamics, including instructor privilege, that can affect the conversation.

During this session, we explored strategies for managing difficult conversations when they emerge unintentionally during class, we discussed how to respond to student comments in ways that facilitate deeper engagement, and we investigated classroom dynamics that can affect the conversation. To explore these concepts further, the following websites provide excellent overviews and guidance.


Student Motivation and Strategic Engagement: What Do They Mean for Student Learning and Classroom Instruction?

Duane Shell, Research Professor, Educational Psychology; Leen-Kiat Soh, Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering

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Session follow-up materials

There are multiple influences on students’ motivation for courses and these motivate how students’ strategically engage with the class, which ultimately affects their learning and achievement. These multiple influences can be understood as profiles which link differing patterns of motivation to different strategic approaches, some highly productive and some dysfunctional. But, how can this understanding be used by faculty to develop more effective teaching and instruction and improve student learning? This session will discuss the research identifying profiles in college courses, including STEM courses, and how to use knowledge of profiles to improve teaching and learning.


If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Marie Barber at mbarber2@unl.edu, 402-472-4354.